Decoloniality and anti-oppressive practices for a more ethical ecology

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May 24, 2021
Author: 
Christopher H. Trisos, Jess Auerbach, and Madhusudan Katti

 

Abstract

Ecological research and practice are crucial to understanding and guiding more positive relationships between people and ecosystems. However, ecology as a discipline and the diversity of those who call themselves ecologists have also been shaped and held back by often exclusionary Western approaches to knowing and doing ecology. To overcome these historical constraints and to make ecology inclusive of the diverse peoples inhabiting Earth’s varied ecosystems, ecologists must expand their knowledge, both in theory and practice, to incorporate varied perspectives, approaches and interpretations from, with and within the natural environment and across global systems. We outline five shifts that could help to transform academic ecological practice: decolonize your mind; know your histories; decolonize access; decolonize expertise; and practise ethical ecology in inclusive teams. We challenge the discipline to become more inclusive, creative and ethical at a moment when the perils of entrenched thinking have never been clearer.

Read the full article in Nature Ecology & Environment.

Associated SESYNC Researcher(s): 
DOI for citing: 
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-021-01460-w
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